• Joshua Ryden

Who's Who in a Trust?


In order for assets in a will to be transferred to a beneficiary, the will must pass through the court process known as probate. During probate, the court oversees the will’s administration, ensuring your assets are distributed according to your wishes, with automatic supervision to handle any disputes.

However, probate proceedings can drag out for months or even years, and your family will likely have to hire an attorney to represent them, which can result in costly legal fees that can drain your estate. In fact, the overwhelming majority of probate cases currently being administered in Coweta County and surrounding counties are handled by attorneys that were hired by estates.


During probate, there’s also the chance that one of your family members might contest your will, especially if you have disinherited someone or plan to leave significantly more money to one relative than the others.


Unlike wills, trusts don’t require your family to go through probate, which can save them time, money, and the potential for conflict. Additionally, when you have a trust set up, the distribution of your assets happens in the privacy of our office—not the courtroom—so the contents and terms of your trust will remain completely private.